NASA Discovers Cluster of Young Stars That Looks Like a Cosmic Christmas Tree

On the first day of Christmas, NASA gave me a star cluster like a Christmas tree.

The spirit of Christmas is everywhere, even in space, as confirmed by the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which recently released a composite image of a cluster of young stars. which looks like a cosmic Christmas tree.

On Tuesday (December 19), NASA published an image of a star cluster, known as NGC 2264, which has since been called the “Christmas Tree Cluster”.

It appears in the form of a cosmic tree with the glow of stellar lights, and is composed of many young stars, with ages between one and five million years old, the administration explained.

NASA has published an image of a star cluster, known as NGC 2264, which has since been called the “Christmas Tree Cluster”

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All these small stars are in our Milky Way, located about 2,500 light-years away from Earth, and both smaller and larger than the Sun, from others less than a tenth the mass of Sun to others with about seven solar. mass, NASA stated.

In the exciting photo, the cluster’s resemblance to a Christmas tree is enhanced by image rotation and color choices.

According to the American Space Administration, optical data from a telescope shows gas in the nebula represented by thin green lines and shapes, creating branches and needles in the shape of a tree.

The iconic astronaut Dr. Buzz Aldrin took to his X account (formerly known as Twitter) to react

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In addition, X-rays detected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, a powerful telescope, are presented as blue and white lights and appear as glowing dots of light in the tree.

In addition, the infrared data showed the foreground and background stars as sparkling dots of white against the blackness of space, NASA said.

The administration noted that the image was rotated about 150 degrees from the astronomical standard of North pointing upwards, placing the apex of the almost conical shape of the tree near the top of the image.

The smaller stars in the cluster are in our Milky Way, which is located about 2,500 light-years away from Earth, and is both smaller and larger than the Sun.

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The result is very impressive and easy, to make a display in time for the holidays, that even the iconic astronaut Dr. Buzz Aldrin took to his X account (formerly known as Twitter) in response.

she WRITES: “This definitely gets me into the holiday spirit – a new image of the “Christmas Tree Cluster,” which is technically NGC 2264, a cluster of young stars. I hope you all enjoy this festive season and looking forward to Christmas!”

The discovery of the festive cluster of young stars comes a month after NASA unveiled a new view of the universe through a galaxy cluster with help from the James Webb Space Telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope. telescope, CBS News previously reported.

Optical data from a telescope shows gas in the nebula represented by thin green lines and shapes

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Officially named MACS0416, the cluster is located approximately 4.3 billion light-years from Earth, according to the space agency.

MACS0416 is called the “Christmas Tree Galaxy Cluster” because “it’s so colorful and because of these twinkling lights we can see inside it. We can see transients everywhere,” said Haojing Yan of the University of Missouri in Columbia, according to People.

Many space enthusiasts reacted with surprise

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